The RMP ended in 2007. For methods in Manchester from 2009 onwards, see methods@manchester

    Research Methods
ESRC

Home

Projects

Briefings

Publications

News

Events

Events Archive

Diary

Training & Courses

Contact

Festival 2006

Festival 2004

Advisory Committee

Links

Search

Researcher Database



EVENTS ARCHIVE

   

Methodological Challenges for the Twenty First Century

Manchester Conference Centre

22 - 23 November 2007

This meeting is designed to bring together RMP members and others to discuss a number of themes that have either emerged as continuing methodological challenges or as areas where there is a lack of dialogue across disciplines or topic areas. Themes covered in the conference include research designs for policy evaluations; strategies for integrating data from mixed methods; the role of RCTs in policy evaluations; the role of genetic information for research into kin relationships; and the role of new forms of data, (transactional, surveillance, administrative)  vis a vis more traditional survey data.

   

Survey Research in the 21 st Century: Challenges and Opportunities

The Royal Statistical Society, Errol Street , London

24 October 2007

This one day conference will bring together leading international experts from different areas of survey methodology to consider the challenges and opportunities that the new century offers to producers and users of survey research.

Chair: Dr Patrick Sturgis, University of Surrey

Speakers: Professor Jon Krosnick ( Stanford University), Professor Roger Jowell ( City University); Professor Mick Couper (University of Michigan ), Professor Nick Buck (University of Essex )

 
   

Using GIS to research the past

University of Lancaster

20-21 September 2007

This two-day course run by Lancaster University's Digital Humanities Initiative, in association with AHDS History builds on the success of a number of workshops and summer schools run as part of the Historical GIS Research Network.

The course offers an introduction to the theory and practice of using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to research the past based on using the ArcGIS software package. It will be relevant to historians, historical geographers, demographers, and others with an interest in the geographies of the past. The instructors are all academics with significant experience in using GIS to conduct historical research. The majority of the course will focus on practical work in an IT lab with comprehensive GIS facilities. 

   

New developments in sequence analysis: Exploring social dynamics and social trajectories

University of Manchester

3 September 2007

This workshop, convened by Gindo Tampubolon and Mike Savage, will:

  • introduce UK academics to an underused and yet powerful method for exploratory longitudinal analysis known as sequence analysis

  • take stock of development in sequence analysis and identify ways forward in its applications

  • encourage young UK academics to try the method which is now available in Stata and to help envision its use in their own research projects

  • solicit solid and comparative paper contributions that address substantively important questions with a novel method

 
   

Longitudinal data analysis in the social sciences: variable constructions in longitudinal research

Royal Statistical Society, London

11 May 2007

'Variable constructions' concern the processes by which survey measures are defined and subsequently interpreted by research analysts. Decisions about variable constructions are amongst the most fundamental of any survey research process, and are particularly pronounced in the context of longitudinal studies. Yet issues of variable constructions are often neglected in introductory methodological accounts.

This introductory workshop, suitable for social science researchers with an interest in the opportunities and challenges associated with longitudinal survey data, will feature a combination of methodological reviews, and expert research presentations in order to provide an accessible introduction to this important topic in the context of large scale longitudinal social surveys. Attention will focus particularly on issues concerned with the measurement of 'class', 'ethnicity' and 'education' in longitudinal government surveys in the UK, though many materials will have a wider relevance. A key aim of the meeting will be to emphasise the practical constraints and issues which impact upon decisions over the construction of such 'key variables' in longitudinal research projects.

   

Radical data for radical research: Tracking and tracing

Royal Statistical Society, London

9 May 2007

This seminar asks how research is able to use data produced as a by-product of day-to-day transactions, for example from use of mobile phones, CCTV footage or from loyalty cards. It is being organised jointly by the ESRC e-Society Programme, the ESRC Research Methods Programme and Chimera, University of Essex.

   

CAQDAS 07 Conference : Advances in Qualitative Computing

Royal Holloway, University of London , Egham

18-20 April 2007

The CAQDAS Networking Project are pleased to announce Call for Papers for the "CAQDAS 07 Conference : Advances in Qualitative Software". This conference is broad in scope to reflect recent developments in IT and qualitative analysis and focuses on advances which support the whole process of conducting various forms of qualitative research; including for example, reference to voice recognition and transcription software, video preparation and processing applications, text analysis and hypertext tools as well as those software packages traditionally understood to fall under the CAQDAS umbrella.

   

Structural equation modelling

University of Surrey

17-18 April 2007

Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) is a powerful and flexible approach to modeling a broad range of data types and formats. It combines aspects of measurement theory, latent variable modeling, simultaneous equations and path analysis, within a single modeling framework. It can be used for analysing both cross-sectional and longitudinal data. This course will provide an introduction to what SEM is and what it can be used for by substantive analysts across the social sciences.

   

Workshop on behaviour coding

University of Essex

16 February 2007

Survey methodologists have used Behaviour Coding as an observation technique to illuminate the nature of interviewer-respondent interaction, although any sort of observable behaviour could be grouped or categorised in this way to reveal aspects of its nature. The workshop will cover practical issues related to the development of coding schemes, methods of observation and uses of resulting data. It is designed to be an informal forum for discussing current methodological issues. PhD students and early career researchers are highly encouraged to attend.

   

Workshop on sequence analysis

University of Essex

15 February 2007

Sequence Analysis is a method of examining the unfolding nature of any run of events or items. Survey methodologists have used this approach to unpack the interactive nature of survey interviews. The workshop will touch on the method's general use as well as cover practical aspects of conducting this type of analysis and will be based on demonstrations of Sequence Viewer and Stata's capabilities. It is designed to be an informal forum for discussing current methodological issues. PhD students and early career researchers are highly encouraged to attend.

   

Using QL Research in Policy and Practice

Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining, London

6 October 2006

Part of an ESRC-funded series exploring the design, practice and utility of Qualitative Longitudinal research organised by Bren Neale of the University of Leeds as part of her ESRC Qualitative Longitudinal Research Fellowship and jointly hosted by the Research Methods Programme.

The meeting will explore the distinctive contribution that Qualitative Longitudinal research can make to policy and professional practice and facilitate a productive exchange between researchers and key research users. Drawing on the perspectives of policy makers and QL researchers, the seminar aims to sharpen thinking about the potential offered by QL research to 'make a difference' in the real world. Speakers include Sue Duncan (Chief Government Researcher, HM Treasury).

   

Second ESRC Research Methods Festival

St Catherine's College, Oxford

17 - 20 July 2006

Further information

   

Cohabitation and the family stability of Australian children, 1946-2000

CCSR, University of Manchester

11 July 2006

A seminar presented by David de Vaus, jointly hosted by the Cathie Marsh Centre and The Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life and Real Methods, a node of the National Centre for Research Methods

 
   

Research design workshop

CCSR, University of Manchester

26 July 2006

A workshop run by David de Vaus, La Trobe University, Australia, aimed at PhD students and early career researchers who are planning their research project.

Professor de Vaus is author of Research Design in Social Research (Sage 2001); Analysing Social Science Data (Sage 2002) and has edited 4 volume collections on Social Surveys (Sage 2002) and on Research Design (Sage 2006).

 
   

What does research tell us about the consequences of divorce for children?

Royal Statistical Society, London

31 May 2006

The RMP project on Methodologies for Studying Families and Family Effects (PI Tom O'Connor) has been examining a range of methodological approaches - spanning multilevel modelling of questionnaire data, direct observations, and qualitative studies based on children's own reports - to the study of family influences on children's development. This seminar will draw together findings from these different aspects of the project. It will be of interest to researchers working on the effects of divorce and other family influences, and to methodologists with an interest in comparing differing methodological approaches.

   

Methods and tools to support interactive ethnographic fieldwork
CCSR, University of Manchester

30 May 2006


A hands-on workshop led by Michael Fischer, University of Kent, sponsored by the Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing (CSAC) and RMP.


The focus will be on how to use tools and tutorials on, and contribute to, AnthroMethods.net, a research community supported wiki-style portal for ethnographic methods hosted by CSAC.

   

Launch event for

Exploring online research methods in a virtual training environment

Royal Statistical Society

27 April 2005

The project "Exploring Online Research Methods in a Virtual Training Environment" is funded by the ESRC Research Methods Programme at the University of Leicester. It aims to enhance understanding of online research methods through the production and evaluation of a training portal targeted at the social science community. The portal will provide a self-supporting online training package covering theoretical, practical and technical aspects of online research methods including web-based questionnaires, virtual synchronous and asynchronous interviews. It will also draw on successful good practice case studies, cover associated ethical issues and provide important resource links.

   

S3RI Symposium on the convergence of methods for the analysis of panel data

University of Southampton

6 - 7 April 2006

A symposium to discuss the current state of the art of the various approached to modelling panel, longitudinal or repeated measure data.

The symposium will be preceded by a short course on the analysis of panel data.

   

Surveys, social capital and social networks

NICVA, Belfast

31 January 2006

This meeting, jointly organised by ESDS Government and the ESRC Research Methods Programme, consists of two half-day seminars which may be booked together or separately

   

Improving the quality of sampling frames

Royal Statistical Society, London

8 December 2005

The second of two half-day seminars held jointly by the Social Research Association and the Research Methods Programme

   

Hands-On Workshop on Occupational Coding

CCSR, University of Manchester

24 November 2005

This workshop gave participants the opportunity to try out new software for coding text to standard occupational and/or industrial classifications.

Following a demonstration, each participant had the opportunity to try out the software and received a free trial version.

   

Use of internet surveys in opinion polling

Royal Statistical Society, London

3 November 2005


The first of two half-day seminars held jointly by the Social Research Association and the Research Methods Programme

   

Mixed-methods: identifying the issues

Chancellors Conference Centre, University of Manchester
26-27 October 2005

 

ESRC is developing an initiative on mixed-methods. This workshop brings together a number of issues that have arisen in the context of RMP-funded projects together with a need to identify what future developments are needed in this area.

   

Participation and Representation: Implications for Ethical Research Practice

University of York

19 July 2005

This event will feed back the main findings from two ESRC Research Methods Programme projects: Informed Consent and the Research Process (led by Rose Wiles and colleagues at the University of Southampton) and Verbatim Quotations in Applied Social Research: Theory, Practice And Impact (led by Anne Corden and Roy Sainsbury, Social Policy Research Unit, University of York).

The half day event will focus on the primary findings from the two projects and their implications for social research practice. There will be an opportunity to discuss the issues raised. The session will be chaired by Peter Kemp, Professor of Social Policy, University of York.

   

Qualitative Management Research: a guide to training needs and resources

University of Manchester

22 June 2005

Organised by the ESRC Research Methods Programme project "Benchmarking Good Practice in Qualitative Management Research". The workshop will examine the training needs in qualitative research and signpost different resources to meet them.

 

   

Participation and Representation: Implications for Ethical Research Practice

Royal Statistical Society, London

26 May 2005

This event will feed back the main findings from two ESRC Research Methods Programme projects: Informed Consent and the Research Process (led by Rose Wiles and colleagues at the University of Southampton) and Verbatim Quotations in Applied Social Research: Theory, Practice And Impact (led by Anne Corden and Roy Sainsbury, Social Policy Research Unit, University of York).  

The half day event will focus on the primary findings from the two projects and their implications for social research practice. There will be an opportunity to discuss the issues raised. The session will be chaired by Mary Boulton, Professor of Sociology, Oxford Brookes University.

   

Consultation on a scoping study for a new longitudinal survey of ethnic minorities

Royal Statistical Society, London

23 May 2005

 

This is a half-day meeting to provide an opportunity to discuss the report of a scoping study, commissioned by ONS and ESRC, on a new longitudinal survey of ethnic minorities.

   

Two-day workshop on online resources

University of Manchester

15 - 16 December 2004

This workshop is primarily designed for members of the RMP Programme who are developing online resources, and invited speakers. Others who are interested in attending may also book.

There is no charge for attending this workshop and delegates will be provided with overnight accommodation (dinner, bed and breakfast) at the Manchester Business School, also free of charge.

 

   

Advanced topics in missing data

23 and 24 November 2004

A workshop organised by Dr James Carpenter and Professor Mike Kenward, as part of the Research Methods Programme.

Williamson Building, University of Manchester

The workshop will involve a combination of lectures, interactive group work and practical computing using R, Stata and WinBUGS.

 

   

Promoting social network analysis

21 and 22 October 2004

A two-day conference at the ESRC Centre for Research on Innovation and Competition (CRIC), University of Manchester.

   

21 October

Learning social network analysis

For postgraduate students and researchers with a potential interest in social network analysis but little knowledge of its applications or software.

   

22 October

New issues in social network analysis

Keynote speaker - Ann Mische, Rutgers University

Four papers by leading experts of social network analysis

   

Linking survey responses and administrative records

27 September 2004

Royal Statistical Society, 12 Errol Street, London

Linkage of survey responses with administrative data records is increasingly being done in the UK. It can potentially provide a route to reducing respondent burden, collecting additional information and reducing measurement error. A number of issues need to be addressed in the data linkage, e.g. what should the matching variable(s) be? Since linkage typically requires explicit consent from respondents, are those who give consent a representative sample?

 

 

Advanced topics in missing data

21 - 22 September 2004

A workshop organised by Dr James Carpenter and Professor Mike Kenward, as part of the Research Methods Programme.

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

The workshop will involve a combination of lectures, interactive group work and practical computing using R, Stata and WinBUGS.

 

An informal meeting to discuss practical issues around setting up online resources

22 July 2004

Manchester Computing, University of Manchester

This will focus on the practicalities of developing online teaching and learning resources with an emphasis on quantitative/data analysis related topics.

 

 

ESRC Research Methods Festival
1 - 3 July 2004

An opportunity to: explore new methods, debate and discuss, network

St Catherine's College, Oxford

Events will be held throughout the three days 1 - 3 July 2004, but Saturday 3 July 2004 will be planned as "Research Students' Day" with events specifically aimed at PhD students.


Aims:

  • to motivate an engagement with methods at a range of levels and across disciplines
  • to provide a concentrated event that brings the Research Methods programme to the key target communities
  • to provide a vehicle for linking together other ESRC methods-related initiatives
  • to stimulate interdisciplinary debate and networking in a relaxed and informal setting.


Audience:

Academics, researchers, PhD students, PhD supervisors, non-academic researchers, including local and central government and the business sector, key overseas participants.


Format:

A series of different events, at different levels, all held over a concentrated three-day period.

 

What kind of work do you do? A practical workshop on occupational classification and coding

21 June 2004

A joint meeting organised with the Warwick Institute for Employment Research


Royal Statistical Society, London

This full-day workshop is designed to improve awareness among social scientists of the ways in which occupational information can inform a variety of research issues, both in UK-based research and within comparative international studies.

The workshop will provide practical guidance on the process of occupational coding, including demonstrations of software developed for coding text responses. Sessions will also be devoted to the construction and use of social classifications derived from occupational information and to the use of occupationally-classified data from recent Censuses of Population.

Speakers include Professors Peter Elias (Warwick), Ken Prandy (Cardiff) and David Rose (Essex); Tessa Staples and Nigel Swier (Office for National Statistics), Rob Jones (Warwick) and Eivind Hoffmann (Norwegian Directorate of Immigration and formerly International Labour Office).

 

Introduction to missing data

1 - 2 June 2004

A workshop organised by Dr James Carpenter and Professor Mike Kenward, as part of the Research Methods Programme.

The workshop involved a combination of lectures, interactive group work and practical computing using R, Stata and WinBUGS.

 

 

Statistical methods for attrition and non-response in social surveys

28 May 2004

A one-day conference organised jointly with JRSS.

The aims of the conference were:

  •  to update the statistics profession on latest research
  •  to provide a forum for young social science quantitative researchers to understand the problems of attrition and non-response
  •  to result in the publication of a collection of papers
  •  to provide survey practitioners, commissioners, customers and  others with an insight into latest research
  •  to provide survey analysts with a guide to best practice
 

Introduction to missing data

25 - 26 May 2004

A workshop organised by Dr James Carpenter and Professor Mike Kenward, as part of the Research Methods Programme.

 

The workshop involved a combination of lectures, interactive group work and practical computing using R, Stata and WinBUGS.

 

 

Linking Data: understanding the past and looking into the future
7 May 2004

This meeting was concerned with identifying examples of current or planned research which sought to address long-run change. For each research application we asked a number of questions for discussion and debate.

To view the programme and presentations please go to the ESDS Government web site.

 
 

Consultation on longitudinal studies

30 April 2004

The aim of this meeting was to report on the recent work on the National Longitudinal Strategy Committee and to consult users and potential users over future directions.

The meeting will took place at the Royal Statistical Society, Errol Street, London.

 

 

Interdisciplinary approaches to studying inequalities in health and quality of life

1-2 April 2004


A joint meeting organised by the Wolfson Research Institute, the University of Durham and the ESRC Research Methods Programme.


The conference/meeting was designed to be an information gathering exercise that allowed discussion and debate.

 

New representations: the use of geodemographic classifications in research and public service delivery

18 - 19 February 2004

Joint seminar in ESRC/NERC/EPSRC Transdisciplinary Series and ESRC Research Methods Seminar Series

Hosted by CASA at University College, London.

 

RM Project Researchers' Workshop

29 - 30 January 2004, University of Manchester

The first of a series of annual two-day workshops restricted to staff appointed to projects. The costs of travel and accommodation will be met by the Programme.

 

Meeting to discuss training provision

20 January 2004

The meeting will bring together all of the training projects funded under the Research Methods Programme – now a total of eighteen projects. In addition, a number of the other key training providers have been invited, including the new National Centre in Research Methods and e-Social Science.

 

Exploring the tension between privacy and the social benefits of government databases

14 January 2004


A virtual discussion meeting using AccessGrid technology, led by Professor George Duncan, Carnegie Mellon University.

The meeting took place at the following UK sites: University of Manchester, University of Southampton, University of Leeds, Imperial College

 

Measuring neighbourhood effects

21 November 2003

This meeting is designed to discuss methods of measuring neighbourhood/area-level effects. The importance of area effects is well recognised as influential across the social sciences (e.g. the influence of neighbourhood on voting preferences, social inequality, unemployment, health inequalities). There is, therefore, a great deal of interest and expertise across disciplines. In addition, there is considerable policy interest in understanding how locality effects work. However, there are very considerable problems in measuring these effects, for example questions of the appropriate spatial level and issues of endogeneity. 

This meeting will bring together experts across disciplines to discuss and debate alternative approaches. 

 
The use of Propensity Score Matching in evaluating the Education Maintenance Allowance
12 November 2003

This is a statistical evaluation design using a longitudinal cohort study involving large random sample surveys of young people (and their parents) in 10 EMA pilot areas and eleven control areas.

Research seminar organised by the Cabinet Office and the ESRC Research Methods Programme

The presentation will be based on two reports published by the Dfee/DfES.

Click here for details of how to download the reports in pdf format.

 

Social Research Funding: Sharing Perspectives
A Joint meeting between the ESRC Research Methods Programme and the Social Research Association
26 September 2003

The seminar will provide information on how Government and the major Charitable Foundations commission and fund research. This will include how to get information about their interests and programmes, how a proposal is evaluated, and the ground rules for conducting and disseminating research. Whilst the ESRC is the key funder of academic research in the social sciences, this seminar is concerned with other major funding bodies, ranging from Government - which, in so far as most work is commissioned, is the most directive to the least directive (Leverhulme) as it chiefly responds to academics' proposals. Together, they fund much more social science research than the ESRC.

 
A framework for assessing research evidence

Research seminar organised by the Cabinet Office and the ESRC Research Methods Programme, based on the Quality in Qualitative Evaluation Report 
15 September 2003

Please note - attendance at this seminar is by invitation only

 

Use of GIS to understand socio-demographic and economic change
Held on Friday, 27 June 2003

 

 

Opportunities for complementarity between longitudinal studies
Held on Friday, 4 April 2003

A meeting organised by the ESRC National Longitudinal Strategy Committee and supported by the ESRC UK Longitudinal Studies Centre.

The UK has rich resources in terms of longitudinal data. The aim of this meeting is to draw attention to opportunities for research which combines several longitudinal studies with different designs. The morning focuses on existing UK studies while the afternoon session extends more widely and brings in linkage between panel studies and administrative records and also examines the complementarily between quantitative and qualitative longitudinal data. We end by looking forward to new opportunities and new demands.

 

   

Introductory event for ESRC Research Methods Programme

Held on 19 - 20 May 2003

 

Threats and opportunities for Labour Market Statistics
Held on Friday, 2 May 2003

Meeting organised by the Labour Market Statistics User Group and the Economic and Social Data Service

 

Workshop on modelling and simulations
Held on Monday, 17 March 2003

The aims of the workshop were to:

  • identify the depth of UK capacity in mathematical modelling and simulations
  • identify the potential of these methods for answering some of the most urgent social science questions, including, for example, population growth, transport and planning, environmental change, disease risk and control
  • encourage cross-disciplinary research between mathematicians and social scientists
  • set out a research agenda for the future
  • identify training needs
 

Combining data: using advanced technology to enhance social science resources
Held Wednesday 18th December 2002

Aim of the workshop: to establish the current state of the art and identify where future development should go.

 

 

Consultation meeting on training in the social sciences
Held Friday November 29th 2002

Aim of the meeting: To consult over training requirements that could be funded under phase 2 of the Research Methods Programme